This is an activity guide based on Scrivener’s Learning Teaching (2005, 2nd ed.). In order to follow the lesson below, you will need the text here.

CHAPTER ONE — Starting Out

SECTION 1 – LOOKING AROUND SOME CLASSROOM DOORS

TASK 2 – Different lessons: Copy, cut and post each of the four classroom descriptions in different locations of your room. Have the participants (hence Ps) stand next to the teaching style that they prefer most. Ask for each situation to be described.

QUESTION: What do the situations have in common? Note [p.14]: None of the situations demonstrates “overt” teaching but each has the teacher managing the situation.

SECTION 2 – WHAT IS THE TEACHER FOR?

DISCUSSION:  What is a teacher for? Not everyone needs one.  (Wait!  Note that one good answer is on p. 19: The teacher is there ‘to make learning happen.’ I would say we help, not make learning happen.)

TASK 4 – Traditional teaching: In small groups discuss and prepare to summarize traditional teaching aspects for the whole class. For example, where does the teacher stand? How are instructions giving?

DISCUSSION:  Quickly draw a jug and mug, then ask how traditional teaching might be like a jug and a mug (see p. 17). Ss are mugs filled with knowledge from the jug/teacher.  Does this perception apply to the Ps’ local situation?

Have Ps  write in their notebooks T ≠ LTeaching does not equal learning!  Repeat aloud a couple times “Teaching does not equal learning!”

WRITE the Einstein quote: “I never attempt to teach my pupils. I only attempt to create the conditions in which they can learn.”

QUESTION: Did Einstein mean that C = L (Conditions equal learning)?   Discuss. My answer would be that it depends on the conditions. Setting possibly effective conditions means demonstrating an understanding  and sensitivity for condition variables like the personal interests and abilities of the students.

Para. 2 p. 19 — What is meant by comprehensible examples, and the need to play with and use  language in a relatively safe environment?

DRAW Krashen’s Input Hypothesis and examine as a class.

KrashenFIG

Summarize that Krashen suggested that L2 might be acquired when the input was comprehensible (i.e. understandable), ample, and in a safe (i.e. open environment), but still slightly challenging (i.e. ‘i + 1’ or known + capable of knowing). Output, as a result,  would then occur from the acquired (or known) language being monitored by already learned (or remembered) features. The keyword is acquired or acquisition. If the theory holds true, acquiring language should not be so difficult, albeit a long endeavor for most learners. Note that Krashen’s idea has criticisms that should be explored at another time.

SECTION 3 – TEACHING AND LEARNING

Figure 1.2 – Briefly discuss the figure in small groups to decide if the teaching ‘outer’ circle could be shifted around. Or, are they fixed as is?  The conclusion is that, yes, the teaching aspects could be shifted around and occur at any point in the learning cycle. Teaching is and should be a dynamic condition, as Einstein suggested.

SECTION 4 – DIFFERENT KINDS OF TEACHER

TASK 7 – Creating a positive learning atmosphere: Brainstorm or Mind map “Good Teacher” and observe the commonalities or unique observations as a whole group.  Note the information on p. 23 (fig. 1.3) as a supplement. And highlight the traits of a successful teacher on p. 24: Respect, empathy, and authenticity.

Three kinds of teacher: Draw and name three faces as seen below. Summarize (i.e. pre-read) the information on p. 25 in order to briefly describe each character: Eric the explainer; Inoussa the involver; and Able the enabler. Place a tick mark as the descriptions expose the character’s area of expertise.

 

Ian

Eric

Farouk

Inoussa

Ali

Able

 

Subject matter

 

 

 

 

Methodology

 

 

 

 

People

 

 

 

Describe a teaching situation with one of the above teachers but do not say the name. Let the whole class guess.

QUESTION: Are there advantages or disadvantages to any or all of these teachers? For example, Able might be more encouraging and memorable. Both of these qualities would support learning. Some students may just want information and not a lot of group involvement so Eric would probably be more appealing.  In any case, each teacher is in class to help learning happen.

END OF LESSON

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