(See AISB,  ICSA, READ-IC and ELSpec South Africa for more recent videos)

 

TESOL TRAINING AND EFL ACTIVITIES 

This video was recorded at the Burkina English Teachers’ Association meeting on 03/04/13. I explained the concept of scaffolding (i.e. support) in a language lesson. My talk describes a few types of scaffolding, but there are certainly more.

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This clip was recorded at L’institut supérieur d’informatique et de gestion (ISIG) de Ouagadougou. The objective was to demonstrate how simple board drawings can help to explain complex concepts. The concept in this case is Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD). The idea of scaffolding (not shown) was briefly discussed prior to the recording.

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This clip is an example from my TESOL course introduction. I begin with an Einstein quote, a brief discussion of CLT, and then (not shown) discuss possible conditions for improving comprehensibility.

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Next is my way of explaining deductive v. inductive approaches to grammar instruction. The content is based on Scott Thornbury’s excellent book from 2000 entitled ‘How to Teach Grammar’ (Chapter 4), I contextualized the concepts using two characters named Deedee and Ian. The strategy helped my participants remember the two approaches. One thing missed in this example was asking at the end who the participants ultimately preferred “to play with.” Click here for the lesson plan.

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Below here is another example inspired by Scott Thornbury’s excellent ‘How to Teach Grammar’ book (Chapter 6).  The objective was to contextualize some grammatical needs and highlight conditions or strategies to address them.

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The following video is from 2008 when I taught elementary school in Thailand. In this activity, student teams (~5Ss x4) answered questioned that I had posed about a picture of a boy’s room (one posted for each team): “Where is the _______?”  The team with the longest answer was the winner. There were three rounds. I did the writing, and only pointed out “boo boos” i.e. mistakes after each team completely finished the dictation.

This speaking activity is collaborative and has opportunities for Ss to incidentally (or inductively) learn grammar. Best of all, it’s fun!

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The Thai kindergartners in this next video were always an especially lively group. The one thing that usually settled them, like all the other classes, was shared reading. Students understood that in order to play the game, after reading, they had to know the story. It was that simple. Please see the paper No contest – Challenging an old EFL approach on my Writings page for more information about reading in an EFL context.

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